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Comedy.co.nz Productions Ltd Presents 

Carey Marx

Intensive Carey

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careymarx_470x270.jpg 

If the doctors hadn’t revived him; we would never have been blessed with this riveting hour of glorious stand-up comedy from a Classic Festival favourite. After starring in the 2009, 2010 & 2011 festivals, Carey took a ‘year off’ to have a brush with death. This is his story (not for the faint-hearted!).

Winner – Best International Show 2009, NZ International Comedy Festival

“… sharp, sweet, cheeky, cynical, romantic and rude as he ever was” **** Chortle.co.uk

“Smart, shocking humour... Intensive Carey really soars” **** The List, UK

"tremendously clever" - Theatreview.org.nz

www.comedy.co.nz

 

 

Showing In:

Auckland

Dates:

Mon 5 - Sat 10 May & Mon 12 - Sat 17 May, 8.30pm

Venues:

The Classic, Auckland

Tickets:

Adults $30.00
Conc. $25.00
Groups 10+ $25.00* service fees may apply

Bookings:

0800 TICKETEK (842 538)

Show Duration:

1 hour
 

Critics Review

Alice Harbourne - Gatherandhunt.co.nz'This isn't just a show of unrelated stories cleverly worked together, though, it's a true story complete with the ups and downs and narrative structure true stories have. There were moments of real sadness that only heightened the laughs when they came, and the pay-off at the end of of the tale is surprisingly life-affirming...'open/close
This show begins with a warning: a heckle could be enough to finish Carey Marx's life. And like that, islands of audience dotted around tables become a united landmass fused under a collective responsibility to ensure this nice British man has a pleasant time, not an on-stage heart attack.

It was clever to get us on side early doors, bridging any potential cultural differences that might arise as a result of this very British hour of comedy. As a fellow pom, I'm delightfully aware of what three years of living in New Zealand has done to my psyche. You're, in general, a very upbeat bunch, and I feel I've been indoctrinated to flinch at the slightest moan, groan or defeatest talk, especially on the topic of death.

A show that begins with a deconstruction of positive thinking bible 'The Secret', therefore, doesn't sound like an immediate hit. But emptying a drawer in your bedroom to tell the universe it's for your future husband/wife, is, as Carey points out, a bit ridiculous and a bit psycho.

His insights on the world have a homely bleakness and it's truly refreshing. Most of these come in anecdotes, which all seem to centre on the notion that life can be shit, but that's okay, because we can laugh at shit, literal or otherwise. From a tale of unintentionally masturbating through a heart attack in a hotel room in the notoriously grim English Midlands, to notoriously grim NHS hospital wards, we find ourselves becoming an incongruous laughter track.

This isn't just a show of unrelated stories cleverly worked together, though, it's a true story complete with the ups and downs and narrative structure true stories have. There were moments of real sadness that only heightened the laughs when they came, and the pay-off at the end of of the tale is surprisingly life-affirming

I found it gloriously indulgent to revert to my cynical British ways for an hour, and by the sounds of it, it didn't take much to convert the audience either. Rarely does an hour of comedy cut to the essence of humanity like this - go and see it.

Read more:
http://www.gatherandhunt.co.nz/Stories/comedy-rr-carey-marx
Kate Ward-Smythe - Theatreview.org.nz'Carey's preamble is a fun gag-filled sarcastic story about friends finding themselves in all the wrong places all over the world, followed by an equally entertaining sarcastic romp around love and the universe, before changing tone and sharing a lovely memory of this happy man's marriage on our own fair shores...'open/close
arey Marx turns the tale of his near death experience into an hour of morphine-soaked street-smart comedy, crude wit and cynical observation, with a chaser of surprising yet completely lovable touch of romance.

It's a totally digestible mix, even though you can't help wondering if he's disobeyed doctor's orders by getting back in the saddle, to bring you all the gory bits and (as he puts it himself) “shockingly disgustingly true” circumstances.

Carey's preamble is a fun gag-filled sarcastic story about friends finding themselves in all the wrong places all over the world, followed by an equally entertaining sarcastic romp around love and the universe, before changing tone and sharing a lovely memory of this happy man's marriage on our own fair shores. We oooh, ahhhh and applaud this unlikely incurable romantic. Then he tags on his simple philosophy on life — which involves socks – and it is apparent the man is easily lead to contentment.

Thereafter, we head into the attack that gripped his heart last year. The porn-fuelled first act – complete with more sock references – is priceless.

Read more:
http://www.theatreview.org.nz/reviews/review.php?id=7001
Kate Ward-Smythe - Theatreview.org.nz'... an hour of morphine-soaked street-smart comedy, crude wit and cynical observation.'open/close
Carey Marx turns the tale of his near death experience into an hour of morphine-soaked street-smart comedy, crude wit and cynical observation, with a chaser of surprising yet completely lovable touch of romance.

It's a totally digestible mix, even though you can't help wondering if he's disobeyed doctor's orders by getting back in the saddle, to bring you all the gory bits and (as he puts it himself) “shockingly disgustingly true” circumstances.

Carey's preamble is a fun gag-filled sarcastic story about friends finding themselves in all the wrong places all over the world, followed by an equally entertaining sarcastic romp around love and the universe, before changing tone and sharing a lovely memory of this happy man's marriage on our own fair shores. We oooh, ahhhh and applaud this unlikely incurable romantic. Then he tags on his simple philosophy on life — which involves socks – and it is apparent the man is easily lead to contentment.

Thereafter, we head into the attack that gripped his heart last year. The porn-fuelled first act – complete with more sock references – is priceless.

For the full review head to:
http://www.theatreview.org.nz/reviews/review.php?id=7001
Liam Golds - KeepingupwithNZ.com'4 Stars - The show is a surreal trip to hell and back, with jokes. Mistaken hospital identities, unachievable trips to the grocery store, and crazed elderly men in diapers... 'open/close
After great success with his shows in 2009, 2010 and 2011, Carey Marx took last year off to have a heart attack. Having cheated death, he’s back with a fascinating new story to tell.

The show is a surreal trip to hell and back, with jokes. Mistaken hospital identities, unachievable trips to the grocery store, and crazed elderly men in diapers. Marx spins this yarn with a sarcastic cynicism, more than happy to take tangents to rip apart those who find their life’s meaning from self-help books or overseas odysseys.

His recent struggles have taught him to find meaning in smaller moments, but he largely avoids schmaltz in favour of mischief. Erectile dysfunction features prominently.

There’s a circular nature to his set that rewards long attention spans, where jokes are told, only to be returned to much later in completely new contexts. Minor gags at the offset could cause an eruption later down the line.

I actually ended up feeling emotion, which was the biggest surprise of the set. The more emotional, even uplifting aspects of his story slowly creep to the surface, even if they were originally buried in a sea of vicious takedowns and wank jokes.

In case you haven’t picked up on it by now, this show isn’t going to be to all tastes. Marx never shies away from the pain, excrement and general body horror that resulted from his brush with death.

He certainly isn’t afraid to alienate, letting moments linger, and leaving the audience to decide what is supposed to be laughed at, which some expecting a more traditional joke/punch line setup may find odd. Those brave enough to chuckle at such dark subject matter will find themselves right at home in his recovery.

Read more:
http://keepingupwithnz.com/2014/05/06/carey-marx-the-classic/
Russell Brown - Public Address'It was funny, ribald in places, blazingly honest and, in the end, quite moving...'open/close
On Monday night I was outside the Classic telling telling Mr Comedy, Scott Blanks, that while I’d enjoyed what I’d seen so far of the 2014 New Zealand International Comedy Festival, nothing I’d seen had actually blown me away. And then I went inside and got blown away.

Carey Marx’s show Intensive Carey is the story of his heart attack and subsequent troubled recovery. Anyone who’s seen Marx at work knows his comedy can be bleak. Well, in parts, this show is really bleak. But at no point on Monday did it feel uncomfortable or like something we shouldn’t be hearing. It was funny, ribald in places, blazingly honest and, in the end, quite moving.

Marx performed this show last year in Britain, but I got the impression that he hadn’t done it for a while and the first 10 or 15 minutes of its New Zealand premiere were a bit lumpy. It also clearly takes Marx himself to some dark emotional places in the telling. But I really can’t recommend this show highly enough.

Elsewhere, I caught the 5 Star Comedy Preview of eight British comics at SkyCity and singled out Sarah Pascoe, John Gordillo and the mad Irishman Michael Legge as the solo shows to see, which we will be doing. And I enjoyed Jeremy Elwood’s show in the Q Vault, in which he grumpily set the world straight on everything from gay marriage to gun control, but couldn’t help but feel I might have missed the better show on opening night, when an AV failure happily brought Tourettes to the stage to do his video turn live.

Read more here:
http://publicaddress.net/hardnews/humour-with-heart/

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